Chef Karl Worley's Biscuit Love Story

Chef Karl Worley: A Biscuit Love Story

Karl Worley’s mother taught him to make biscuits like his grandmother’s. He honed his technique while wooing his wife, Sarah.

“I made her a lot of biscuits when we dated,” said Worley, who said she initially told him that she couldn’t get serious because she was heading to culinary school at Johnson & Wales University in Denver. He’d always been interested in culinary school, but he knew following Sarah was definitely the right choice.

“Two weeks later I sold everything and was on my way to Colorado,” he said.

While out West, Worley would stock up on Southern flour and bake biscuits to bring the South into their kitchen. “Biscuits was one of my happy place, home things.” Once back home in Tennessee, Worley first wanted to open a hot chicken food truck, but again love for his wife steered his decision.

“She said, ‘You’re crazy. I love your biscuits,’” he said. “I was smart enough to listen to her.”

He listened once more when they were driving down the road and she blurted out the name “Biscuit Love.” It became the name of their first food truck business and is now the name of their brick-and-mortar restaurant in Nashville, where Worley offers up biscuits and sausage gravy, fried chicken biscuit sandwiches and deep-fried biscuit doughnuts. The love that started their culinary adventure and is now the name of their restaurant helps provide the foundation for their biscuit gospel. Together, they spread the word about locally produced Southern products and create delicious biscuit-based menus. “I never had the guts to do any of it until I met her. She’s in it every day with me,” Worley said of his love for his wife.

Now, he’s bringing his love of all things biscuit to CrateChef, sharing his recipes and some of his favorite products in a gourmet subscription box with a country breakfast theme that will inspire home chefs to make breakfasts extraordinary in their own kitchen.

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